Blog Archives

No. 16: Marie Davidson – Working Class Woman

Marie Davidson – Working Class Woman
Label: Ninja Tune ‎– ZEN250
Released: 05 Oct 2018
Genre: Electronic, Pop
Style: House, Techno, Synth-pop

Marie Davidson, Lamusa II – La Ecstase

MARIE DAVIDSON ANNOUNCES “SO RIGHT EP” OUT ON 30TH NOV ON NINJA TUNE.

Listen to ‘La Ecstase’ a collaboration with Italian producer and fellow RBMA alumni Lamusa II, which is released now alongside a remix from Silent Servant (L.I.E.S / Cititrax / Hospital Productions).

On ‘La Ecstase’ the lyrics – spoken in French and Italian – take in the sights, sounds and emotions of an early morning dance floor, Marie’s spoken-text observations riding out over a sluggish electro baseline. For his remix, Silent Servant ramps up the sense of dread to take the listener on a more angst ridden trip.

Making up the EP are the previously released ‘So Right’ extended club version and a remix by John Talabot – with all tracks available physically for the first time on 30th November.

“So Right EP” follows the recent release of Marie Davidson’s album “Working Class Woman” on Ninja Tune.

Marie Davidson – So Right (Original + John Talabot Remix)

Marie Davidson’s new album turns the mirror on herself. “Working Class Woman” – released on 5th October on Ninja Tune – is the Montreal-based producer’s fourth and most self-reflective record: it’s a document of her state of mind, of operating within the spheres of dance music and club culture. Drawing on those experiences, as well as an array of writers, thinkers and filmmakers who’ve influenced her, Davidson’s response to such difficult moments is to explore her own reaction to them and poke fun. “It comes from my brain, through my own experiences: the suffering and the humour, the fun and the darkness to be Marie Davidson.” It’s an honest document of where she currently stands. As she puts it,“It’s an egotistical album – and I’m okay with that.” 

The sound of “Working Class Woman” is more direct than any of her previous outings. She still mines the same influences, from Italo Disco, to proto-industrial and electro, but leadens them with a gut-punching weight, making for a record that’s more visceral than any she’s released before. Industrial heaviness is balanced by Davidson’s spoken text – rather than spoken word, which she sees as a distinct tradition – dark, textured soundscapes are counterweighted by statements that carry a more darkly humourous edge than before, making observations on both aspects of club culture as well as more oblique critiques of the modern world. It’s something that’s encapsulated in the driving momentum of lead single ‘So Right’, released alongside a remix from John Talabot: it matches pared back lyrics with a melodic bassline and bright synths, her words sketching out a euphoric feeling that chimes with the music.